OpinionSpotlight

What Will Super Tuesday Results Mean for PA Voters?

A graphic showing the states that voted on the Super Tuesday primary election day on March 3rd, 2020. Photo: ABC News

While the iconic “Super Tuesday” does not include Pennsylvania’s primary election, the 2020 Super Tuesday marked a shift in the election for voters all around. 

With extremely close calls in headlining elections, specifically the Iowa Caucus and New Hampshire primary, the Democratic Party had no clear winner yet. While Bernie Sanders snagged the plurality of votes, those of the more moderate-leaning candidates were spread out among candidates like Pete Buttigieg or Joe Biden. 

Before Super Tuesday, many assumed that this same pattern would continue into Super Tuesday’s polls. However, things took a turn when both Pete Buttigieg and Amy Klobuchar suspended their campaigns to endorse Joe Biden. As of Sunday evening, Pete officially announced the closure of his campaign via social media, yet he endorsed Biden the next day, issuing the following statement: 

“The only way we beat Trump is through a politics that reflects the decency of the American people. It’s what we sought to practice in my campaign—and it’s what @JoeBiden has practiced his whole life.” 

While Amy Klobuchar’s similar actions brought less craze, the combination of Biden-turned Klobuchar and Buttigieg supporters may have been the driving force of Biden’s Super Tuesday victory. 

Out of the 14 states, Biden and Sanders were the only candidates to “win” a state, or get the most delegates. Biden took the win in 10 of these states, with Bernie only winning 4, although he did win California, a very large state. This put Biden in the lead, with 566 delegates as of Wednesday evening, with Bernie trailing behind at 501.

Wednesday morning, Mike Bloomberg joined Buttigieg and Klobuchar in dropping out to endorse Joe Biden. This may further strengthen Biden’s lead, leaving only 2 other candidates left: Bernie Sanders and Tulsi Gabbard.

Sanders has an incredibly strong voter base, so it is unlikely that he will suspend his campaign anytime soon, but Warren dropped out at around 11:30 AM EST on Thursday. This was suspected directly after Super Tuesday after Roger Lau, Warren’s campaign manager, acknowledged Warren’s lacking Super Tuesday performance, which included coming in 3rd in her home state Massachusetts. To his staff, Lau wrote, “We fell well short of viability goals and projections,” and  that “The decision is in [Warren’s] hands.” 

Warren has not yet endorsed a competitor, and it is unclear whom Warren’s supporters may flock to, although many suspect they are Saders-oriented. While Biden’s lead is currently strong, Sanders’ voter base may expand from this. 

Tusli Gabbard, on the other hand, has only earned 1 delegate and is unlikely to influence the nominee if her campaign comes to a close. She is additionally very moderate, so some of her supporters may even go for Trump. 

For Pennsylvania voters, who will cast their vote on April 28th, options will be limited, as most candidates have ended their campaign. Regardless, it is still important to cast your vote; it is unclear what direction the election is headed in, even after watching Biden dominate Super Tuesday. 

If you are not registered to vote yet, but will be 18 by April 28th, you can register to vote on websites such as votespa.com

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